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is dealing with some darkness or loneliness or some doubt. we have the opportunity to be an element of kindness and encouragement to people. let's not forget we all have the opportunity to do that with the people in our circle as well. >> heather: i heard this tossed around a lot, a description of not being the commander in chief but taking the roll on as the comforter in chief. do you think that should be the first priority? >> he has done that. that is why i said i'm not sure words are important or he should even speak. people want to see the president is there and he can reach out to people and comfort them and be there. he listens to them that he hears them, that is what i think we wanted to see for ourselves. >> heather: what about lessons he can share from this tragedy and since his time in the oval office? >> i think that is very difficult. i'm not sure that those kinds of lessons. he is not a preacher, he is the president for him to be talking about. he is the person that is there comforting and representing the nation in his effort. >> well said. on that point, i'm a little
? desire, loneliness, the hobbled search for justice and for just one thing that is lucky or fair, these are some of the timeless themes literature has explored from the beginning, and this year is no exception. the finalists are junot diaz, this is how you lose her. [cheers and applause] finish -- published by riverhead books, an imprint of pepping win group -- penguin group with, usa. dave egger, a hologram for the king -- [applause] published by mcsweeny's books. louise erdrich, the round house, published by harper, an imprint of harpercollins. [applause] ben fountain, billy lynn's long -- [inaudible] [applause] published by echo press, an imprint of harpercollins. kevin powers, the yellow bird. published by little brown. [applause] the 2012 national book award for fiction dose -- goes to "the round house", by louise erdrich. [applause] ♪ ♪ hey, baby, where are you is? [laughter] [applause] [laughter] >> wow. hello, my relatives. [speaking in native tongue] national book foundation and also the judges, and a shout out for all of the native people who are watching this live
's not think that this is a warning sign. it certainly is not. it's the isolation. it's a loneliness, the awkwardness, that means he doesn't have close people near him to help him get through the hard times. he doesn't have people to share his issues and problems with. he doesn't have others around him to help him get perspective of what he's feeling and thinking. >> then again we should say the brilliance has been identified by people who knew him. of course we don't have iq tests to compare this. to however, with regard to a motive, no sort of manifesto or note at this point the police say was found. what does that tell you if it ends up there was nothing left? >> most mass murderers do not leave notes behind. some have done that and some have sent letters to the press before their rampages, some have made videos explaining to the world what they were going to do so the world doesn't misunderstand them. and they don't get mistreated in the press. but for someone who's isolated like this, for someone who's quiet and reserved and shy, it would not be his style to wish to communicate
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